Building a Vertical Pallet Garden

Chef Janie, the ORIGINAL Pallet Planter on Youtube!! Be sure and subscribe for more!!!
Have an old pallet laying around the yard? Here’s a keen way to get good use out of it’s framework. Two hours and you have a beautiful decorative garden that is edible too! WARNING: How to find and use the proper ‘heat-treated’ wood pallet; do not use ‘chemically’ treated wood pallets for indoor furniture, children’s rooms, composting or for food growing; herbs, strawberries, etc… Use only ‘untreated’ or ‘heat’ treated pallets. First, Methyl Bromide (insecticide on wood shipping crates) was phased out as a fumitory chemical in 1995, but some of these pallets may still be around, so look for the symbol on crates. Most pallets in the USA have been heat-treated for foreign pests, the symbol is “IPPC“ and are safe. Pallets used in foreign countries may still contain insecticides. Check your own countries codes for pallet uses. Thanks, and as always, be a safe gardener. Enjoy the video — Chef Janie

Colourburst at Great Dixter!
The gardens at Great Dixter were created in 1910 by English architect Edwin Lutyens, in the manner of cottage gardens on a grander scale. The gardens are set in the grounds of the manor house, first built in 1220 and added to in 1464. The house boasts an impressive timber-framed hall, one of the largest surviving in the UK. The Great Hall’s roof with its oak frame and crown post, is of particular note. It is decorated with carved shields and contains a fireplace, one of Lutyens additions. The gardens and home are owned by well known gardening author and lecturer Christopher Lloyd.

Text © Barbara Ballard 2001

For full information on the garden visit www.destinations-uk.com, www.destinations-uk.com/gardens.php?link=gardens&coun… Dixter Gardens, Sussex and www.greatdixter.co.uk/

Since Christopher Lloyd’s death your support will ensure the preservation of his historic house. The Great Dixter Charitable Trust is committed to maintaining the site as an innovative centre for horticulture and plantsmanship. In May 2009 the Trust was successful in raising funding to acquire the 60% share in the estate outside their ownership. With a further generous donation they were also able to buy Nathaniel Lloyd’s Dixter farm buildings.

For more information on how you can help, please visit www.greatdixter.co.uk/friends.htm

By antonychammond on 2009-09-17 03:06:04
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